Three Birds

The Doctor is at work trying to relieve the pain and suffering of other humans.
The female Homo sapien that lives with him in his giant nest on the bank of the North River is at home. She is keeping nest, protecting family, gathering food, creating a social life, paying bills, making investments and generally eliminating stressors the Doctor does not want to hear about. However, this morning she made an observation that she felt the Doctor must know immediately. Here is a copy of her email.
e henvelpoe (1)
This is going to be interesting……….we seem to have three ospreys. One on the lower, two on the upper platform.
Female H. sapien, MD, FAAP, CPC

A pleasant ring tone, “Dawn Chorus,” chimed upon the Doctor’s desk.

cell phone on desk

He didn’t hear it; he never hears the soft pretty sounds that are supposed to attract his attention, even if it’s an arm’s length away, intentionally placed so that he will stop missing important communications. Sometimes when the Doctor works he becomes so absorbed in a particular case, he is oblivious to external stimuli.  It’s like he becomes a humanoid or something.  This peculiar, idiopathic, characteristic has been noted by more than one of his associates.

Nonetheless, at lunch time the Doctor checked his emails.

“What? Three osprey on the Taj Mahal?”
“Oh, no!” Thought the Doctor. “This could be trouble.”
“Are you sure you saw three?”
“I saw three,” Female H. sapien responded coolly, perturbed by the Doctor’s skeptical query.

About Harriett Raptor

Harriett O. Raptor 8-year-old mother of five, lifelong mate of Ozzie Raptor until he perished last year, fluent in telepathy with The Doctor and possessor of genetic memory. She is an intellectual, a scholar, philosopher and thinker; a wise, learned osprey especially distinguished for her expertise on the H. sapiens problem.
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2 Responses to Three Birds

  1. Lou says:

    Could it be one of her off springs?

  2. No, Osprey progeny do not return to their birth site. If a newborn Osprey makes it to South America the 1st year of their life (50% don’t) they will stay there for 18 months. When they finally do make their 1st migration back to North America during the 2nd year of their life they find their own new sites to nest. The parents of a newborn Osprey actually leave the juvenile alone in the nest and take their own separate vacations in South America during the winter. The newborn must make his way on pure instincts to the wintering grounds in South America. There pattern is to head south and stay overland as much is possible. I’ve read that 50% of newborns don’t make it to their 2nd year. It’s a tough world out there. Thanks for being interested.

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