Windy, Rainy Easter

Yesterday – Wet, windy and raining.

It’s not easy to see our two eggs. We keep them covered all the time. The Doctor was quick today though and got these two video clips.
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Today – (Easter Sunday)

Ozzy, What a guy!

Watch how he takes over the incubation and gives me a fish. He’s still a little bit awkward; it takes him 30 seconds or more to get situated, but he is right there for me all the time. I really love him.
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Incubation begins when the first egg is laid. Subsequent eggs are laid one to three days apart, with 2-4 eggs in each clutch (never seven days apart!). The female usually takes on most of the responsibility of incubation, seldom leaving the nest except to feed. The male will take over incubation until she returns.

On average, the male will “spell” the female ten times per day.

Ozzy incubating
Ozzy giving Harriett a break

Incubation lasts 34 to 40 days and if the eggs are fertile, they will hatch in the order they were laid.

Both osprey parents have a brood patch, although the female will incubate the majority of the time (around 70%).

Incubation can be a bit sporadic until the second egg arrives. I believe we observed this the first few days after Harriett laid her first egg. As one of our readers has commented, “maybe, just maybe, Harriett didn’t start incubating the first egg immediately as osprey eggs can remain viable for quite awhile before the incubation process begins”. This would also result in a shorter hatching interval, thus giving the second chick a better chance of survival.

During the evening, the female will normally do all the incubating.

night Ocean
Nighttime on the North River

Please click here if you read this from an e-mail. https://ospreytales.wordpress.com/

Goodnight all.

Love,

Harriett

About Harriett Raptor

Harriett O. Raptor 8-year-old mother of five, lifelong mate of Ozzie Raptor until he perished last year, fluent in telepathy with The Doctor and possessor of genetic memory. She is an intellectual, a scholar, philosopher and thinker; a wise, learned osprey especially distinguished for her expertise on the H. sapiens problem.
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4 Responses to Windy, Rainy Easter

  1. Mark Merrick says:

    Great Videos! It was amazing how short they left the egg uncovered.

  2. Thank you Gena, and Ozzie thanks you too.

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